Outcomes:

The Eating Disorder Center of California conducts outcome surveys for all clients who enter and leave treatment. Data is collected upon admission, mid-treatment, discharge and post-discharge. The objectives in conducting outcome surveys are as follows: to determine how clients are meeting their treatment and recovery goals; to obtain information/statistics to continually review, update and improve the quality of services delivered; to provide information for ongoing program evaluation and Quality Improvement; to provide statistics to referral sources regarding treatment outcomes for clients receiving treatment at the EDCC.

The EDCC utilizes the following measures in their outcome studies:

The Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2): Effectiveness Measure. The EDI-2 is a widely used, standardized, self-report measure of psychological symptoms commonly associated with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and other eating disorders (Garner, 1991).

Beck Depression Inventory®-II (BDI®-II): Effectiveness Measure. The BDI–II consists of 21 items to assess the intensity of depression in clinical and normal patients.

EDCC Client Surveys: Effectiveness and Efficiency Measure. The EDCC client surveys are self report measures that consist of a variety of questions relating to eating disorder behaviors (i.e. bingeing and purging, exercise history, menstrual history), relationship and quality of life, prior treatment history and general assessment questions. The surveys are conducted at Admission, Interim, Discharge and Post-Discharge.

EDCC Program Evaluation/Client Satisfaction Survey: Effectiveness and Efficiency Measure. The EDCC Program Evaluation Survey consists of a series of questions that relate to a client’s level of satisfaction with certain aspects of the treatment program and their assessment of the degree of effectiveness the treatment program had in alleviate their symptoms.

Treatment Satisfaction and Helpfulness Results: Most recent surveys, Year 2006

94% of clients reported that they were satisfied with their treatment (72% of respondents reported being very satisfied with the services and treatment received).

94% of clients reported that they were very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the program (67% of respondents reported being extremely satisfied with the services and treatment received).

94% of clients reported that they felt as if the treatment was helpful, very helpful or extremely helpful in their progress towards recovery. 78% reported treatment as being very helpful or extremely helpful on their progress towards recovery.

94% of clients indicated that they felt the EDCC program was an important aspect in their overall recovery.

94% of clients indicated that they were satisfied, very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the help they received to access their strengths during their treatment. 88% of clients reported they were very satisfied or extremely satisfied.

94% of respondents indicated that they were satisfied, very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the help they received to advance their own recovery (83% reported they were very satisfied or extremely satisfied).

83% of clients felt that their eating disorder behaviors were significantly reduced by participating in the EDCC program.

Comparison of Surveys Completed Upon Admission, Interim, Discharge and Post-Discharge:

Frequency of food intake restriction (last 30 days): Significant decrease in clients’ reports of food intake restriction.

Time required by symptoms on an average symptomatic day: Significant decrease in clients’ reports of symptoms.

Time required by symptoms on an average symptomatic day: Significant decrease in clients’ reports of time required by symptoms.

Frequency of self-induced vomiting: Significant decrease in clients’ reports of self-induced vomiting.

Overall Health: Significant increase in clients’ reports regarding their overall health.

Research on Genes and Eating Disorders

The National Institute of Mental Health is sponsoring a multicenter, international study seeking to determine whether a gene or genes might predispose individuals to develop anorexia nervosa. They need families with at least two relatives (e.g., sisters, brothers, cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents) who have or had anorexia nervosa, and who would be willing to participate. The study involves the completion of interviews, questionnaires and a blood draw. Participants do not need to travel and will be paid upon completion of the study. For more information call 1-888-895-3886, email EDResearch@upmc.edu or visit the website www.angenetics.org.